Sebanyak 793 item atau buku ditemukan

Building a Data Warehouse

With Examples in SQL Server

Building a Data Warehouse: With Examples in SQL Server describes how to build a data warehouse completely from scratch and shows practical examples on how to do it. Author Vincent Rainardi also describes some practical issues he has experienced that developers are likely to encounter in their first data warehousing project, along with solutions and advice. The relational database management system (RDBMS) used in the examples is SQL Server; the version will not be an issue as long as the user has SQL Server 2005 or later. The book is organized as follows. In the beginning of this book (chapters 1 through 6), you learn how to build a data warehouse, for example, defining the architecture, understanding the methodology, gathering the requirements, designing the data models, and creating the databases. Then in chapters 7 through 10, you learn how to populate the data warehouse, for example, extracting from source systems, loading the data stores, maintaining data quality, and utilizing the metadata. After you populate the data warehouse, in chapters 11 through 15, you explore how to present data to users using reports and multidimensional databases and how to use the data in the data warehouse for business intelligence, customer relationship management, and other purposes. Chapters 16 and 17 wrap up the book: After you have built your data warehouse, before it can be released to production, you need to test it thoroughly. After your application is in production, you need to understand how to administer data warehouse operation. What you’ll learn A detailed understanding of what it takes to build a data warehouse The implementation code in SQL Server to build the data warehouse Dimensional modeling, data extraction methods, data warehouse loading, populating dimension and fact tables, data quality, data warehouse architecture, and database design Practical data warehousing applications such as business intelligence reports, analytics applications, and customer relationship management Who this book is for There are three audiences for the book. The first are the people who implement the data warehouse. This could be considered a field guide for them. The second is database users/admins who want to get a good understanding of what it would take to build a data warehouse. Finally, the third audience is managers who must make decisions about aspects of the data warehousing task before them and use the book to learn about these issues.

For example, data definition metadata helps new users understand the meaning
of each fact and dimension attribute, along with its sample values. Data definition
metadata also helps avoid misunderstanding among existing users about the ...

The DNA of Customer Experience

How Emotions Drive Value

As the World Thought Leaders on Customer Experience, Colin Shaw and the team at Beyond Philosophy have undertaken more than 18 months of groundbreaking research to discover the emotions that drive and destroy value in an organization, and can now disclose the empirical link between evoking these emotions and substantial financial returns.

As the World Thought Leaders on Customer Experience, Colin Shaw and the team at Beyond Philosophy have undertaken more than 18 months of groundbreaking research to discover the emotions that drive and destroy value in an organization, and ...

The Satisfied Customer

Winners and Losers in the Battle for Buyer Preference

When faced with the choice between cutting costs or improving customer service, most companies focus on tangible assets. But in our service economy, the most important asset is intangible: a company's relationship with its customers. The Satisfied Customer is a blueprint for understanding this fact of modern business and reveals the unheralded value of customer satisfaction. Drawing on the results of a massive survey of American consumer satisfaction and including examples from companies like Home Depot and UPS, Fornell presents some surprising conclusions about outreach strategy (exceeding a customer's expectations is risky, and increasing customer complaints can actually be a good thing). He also explains how to quantify and increase the value of a firm's customer relationships--what he calls the Customer Asset.

The Satisfied Customer is a blueprint for understanding this fact of modern business and reveals the unheralded value of customer satisfaction.

Customer Satisfaction Measurement for ISO 9000: 2000

For the first time, the ISO 9000 quality management standard requires that registered companies measure customer satisfaction. Many customer surveys produce misleading results due to poor questionnaire design, inappropriate data collection methods and invalid statistic analysis. Customer Satisfaction Measurement for ISO 9000 explains in a clear and simple manner how to conduct a professional customer satisfaction survey that will produce a reliable result - as well as being consistent with the requirements of ISO 9001:2000. Each step of the customer satisfaction measurement process is explained sequentially and each is linked to appropriate clauses in the ISO 9001:2000 statement.

Customer Satisfaction Measurement for ISO 9000 explains in a clear and simple manner how to conduct a professional customer satisfaction survey that will produce a reliable result - as well as being consistent with the requirements of ISO ...

Managing the Customer Experience

A Measurement-based Approach

Many companies have customer loyalty research programs. But most of those programs fall short of their intended purpose, either because they fail to include important drivers of loyalty or because of the form in which the research results are reported. Managing the Customer Experience avoids these missteps. It begins with an explanation of the interrelationship between brand image, customer emotions evoked by contact with service employees, and the shopping environment. The book then identifies what information is necessary for managing the customer experience, and describes how it can be obtained. The discussion then moves to analysis and reporting of information: the management decision tools and information needed by each level of management, and how the data from the studies described previously can produce it. The book concludes with a discussion of issues that arise in the construction of management decision tools.

The book then identifies what information is necessary for managing the customer experience, and describes how it can be obtained.